Apple with patulin fungus

When apples, pears and grapes begin to rot, a greyish-green mould begins to grow. This mould is called patulin and is a mycotoxin caused from a common fungus. The maximum acceptable level of patulin in production varies across the globe, and even varies in the type of product being produced—apple juice versus apple cider or apple sauce, for example. 

The level of patulin on fruit results from a number of factors, including how much fruit was picked off the ground before processing, how the fuit was handled during transport (bruised fruit will produce patulin), and storage conditions of the fruit (warm conditions will produce more patulin than cool facilities). 

Although patulin is colorless and flavorless in produced fruit juice and products, it must be removed due to is toxicity to humans.

Patulin can be removed by treating juice with polymeric adsorbents such as Macronet® MN102.